2021 Course Descriptions – Monday

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To View A Complete List of Speakers, Visit The 2021 Conference Speakers Page

Find your course by day below:

Monday

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8:00-9:15 AM CST

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COVID-19: Past, Present, and Future – Keynote Presentation

Jennifer Shuford, MD, MPH

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COVID-19 caught us by surprise and changed the world as we know it. Although there is a long tradition of pandemic planning in public health, existing pandemic response plans did not anticipate all of the challenges that COVID-19 brought. We are now in a position to evaluate how the COVID-19 pandemic has unfolded. In this presentation, we will review the pandemic dynamics and response to this point in time, and then examine current epidemiological trends. Lastly, we will identify areas where we need to focus our attention and adjust plans, on the local, state, national, and international levels, for a more effective response during the next pandemic.Objectives: Describe the initial reports and identification of the novel coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 / Discuss the current situation of the COVID-19 pandemic in Texas / Give examples of lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic response

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9:30-10:30 AM CST

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Preparatory, Special Considerations

The Duty to Act – What Happened to Our Solemn Duty?

Stephen Wirth, EMS Attorney, Paramedic

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Recent news media reports have focused on public safety officers who have acted improperly or unprofessionally toward a patient or the public. How we, as EMS practitioners conduct ourselves and treat our diverse patients and citizens – especially in this challenging post-COVID world – says a lot about our values and our profession. As EMS professionals, we simply cannot stand by when observing troubling behavior of coworkers and other public safety professionals. Difficult, but necessary steps must be taken at times to prevent harm to others and reduce our risk of being complacent, complicit, or even civilly or criminally liable for our actions – or inactions. In this session, we will describe the 3 essential attributes of the professional EMS practitioner. We will also cover 6 steps you can implement now to reduce the likelihood of “unprofessional” and bad behaviors that can lead to harm to others – especially the citizens we serve.

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9:30-10:30 AM CST

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CRO, Preparatory

Advanced Procedures in Rural EMS

Justin Fairless, DO, LP, FACEP, FAEMS

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Long transport time? Helicopter not flying due to weather? No problem! Rural EMS is a unique pre-hospital practice that requires the knowledge and proficiency to perform advanced medical and surgical procedures that time would not permit or require in the urban setting. Long transport times and lack of access to Level I Trauma and Cardiac centers within a reasonable period of time, necessitate that Rural EMS Providers are credentialed for advanced procedures.

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9:30-10:30 AM CST

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Medical, Patient Assessment

Stranger Things: Lethal ECG Patterns

Stephen Rahm, NRP

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This presentation reviews ECG patterns that suggest a significant underlying problem, which requires the EMS provider’s immediate attention. Recognition of certain lethal or potentially lethal ECG patterns can enable the provider to anticipate treatment needs, thus preventing a catastrophe from happening right in front of them. Included in this presentation are patterns suggestive of cardiac ischemia that do not present with ST elevation; patterns suggestive of life-threatening hyperkalemia; and common patterns observed in patients with significant hypothermia, among others.

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9:30-10:30 AM CST

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Airway, Pediatric

Mechanical Ventilation of Infants and Children in Transport

Bryan Winchell, EMT-P, FP-C, CCRN, CFRN, C-NPT

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Elderly medical patients can present a challenge to EMS providers of all levels. As we age, physiological changes, comorbidities, decreased mobility, and medications can complicate diagnosis and treatment. Patient anxiety can also lead patients to be less forthcoming with strangers due to fear of losing independence. Often, patients will minimize symptoms in hopes of not “having to go to the hospital.” Anchoring bias can cause EMS providers to miss or discount key clinical findings. In this presentation will look at the physiology of aging, differences in exam techniques, differences in “normal” vital signs, and how to effectively communicate with elderly patients in order to optimize treatment.

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9:30-10:30 AM CST

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Patient Assessment, Special Considerations

Geriatric Medical Assessment Pearls

Gary Saffer, MPA, NRP

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Elderly medical patients can present a challenge to EMS providers of all levels. As we age, physiological changes, comorbidities, decreased mobility, and medications can complicate diagnosis and treatment. Patient anxiety can also lead patients to be less forthcoming with strangers due to fear of losing independence. Often, patients will minimize symptoms in hopes of not “having to go to the hospital.” Anchoring bias can cause EMS providers to miss or discount key clinical findings. In this presentation will look at the physiology of aging, differences in exam techniques, differences in “normal” vital signs, and how to effectively communicate with elderly patients in order to optimize treatment.

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9:30-10:30 AM CST

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Preparatory, Special Considerations

The Magic of 3 AM

Christopher Suprun, NRP, FP-C

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This session pays homage to EMS pioneer and legend, Jim Page. It will both cover the timeless essence of his book – The Magic of 3 AM – with perspectives on how those views relate to today’s EMS. Additionally, we will see what modern magic we can use to enhance the presentation to maintain the attention and interest of providers starting their first EMT school to the veteran of multiple career incidents.

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9:30-10:30 AM CST

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Preparatory, Special Considerations

Mental Health for the 911 Responder: What Number do They Call? 

Karen Yates, MSN, RN, RN-BC, CEN, LP

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In this presentation the speakers will cover the unfortunate topic of depression, PTSD, and suicide in first responders. They will discuss warning signs, peer support, support services, and other resources. They will discuss the development of a regionalized approach to first responder mental health awareness, including a grant funded program to provide training and support services. Objectives: discuss the prevalence of depression, PTSD, and suicide in first responders / identify warning signs of depression, PTSD, and suicidal ideations / discuss a peer-based approach to assisting first responders in crisis / list components of a grant funded multi agency mental health assistance program for first responders.

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9:30-11:30 AM CST

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Airway

Hands-On Specialty Workshop

Can You Ventilate?

Bob Page, MEd, NRP, CCP, NCEE, CHSE, CHSOS

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From low tech to high tech, how can we learn to be better at skill of ventilation? This hands-on workshop will allow the participant to see and use different ventilation adjuncts and monitors on simulators designed with some degree of haptics (feedback) to help the learner understand the process of ventilation. Class size will be limited to allow more practice time. Objectives: demonstrate the techniques of ventilation, mask seals and negative pressure and positive pressure / describe the concept in the relationships of time versus volume in ventilation / describe various indicators of adequate and inadequate ventilations / discuss various clinical Implications of poor ventilation techniques.

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9:30-11:30 AM CST

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Patient Assessment, Trauma

Hands-On Specialty Workshop

Tactical Skills Workshop

Kevin Ramdayal, Deputy Chief

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This rapid-fire workshop will test the skills of even the most veteran EMS Provider. This workshop is based on EMS skills within a tactical environment. The following skills can be expected within this session: tourniquet application; rapid triage; tactical patient movement, and needle decompression/advanced airway maneuvers. Objectives: recognition of tourniquet uses on various injuries / recognition and mastery of various triage categories / learn various patient removal techniques within a tactical environment / learn various targeted ALS skills within the tactical environment.

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11:15 AM-12:15 PM CST

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Medical, Patient Assessment

Panhandlers, Transients & Homeless Patients  

Ken Bouvier, NREMT, Paramedic, Professional Speaker

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This session will help Prehospital Care Practitioners, Emergency Nurses & Physicians, Respiratory, X-ray and Lab Technicians better recognize the challenges while caring for panhandlers, transients and the homeless. During this session we will discuss how Panhandlers, Transients and the Homeless struggle with mental illness, alcoholism, and drug abuse. This session will show how these 3 groups impact Emergency Medical Services, local Emergency Rooms and the cost of health care in the United States. Objectives: recognize the challenges while caring for Panhandlers, Transients & Homeless / recognize how sick these patients are / understand how dangerous these patients can be / understand the importance of wearing Body Substance Isolation / recognize that these patients often carry weapons / understand the types of illness and injury these patients often present with and will review the BLS & ALS.

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11:15 AM-12:15 PM CST

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Medical, Trauma

Suspended Animation: Surviving Hypothermic Cardiac Arrest

Eric Jaeger, EMS Instructor Coordinator, Paramedic, EMS Educator

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This presentation will share vivid, well documented stories of incredible survival from hypothermic cardiac arrest. Recent events demonstrate the importance of this topic, even in southern parts of the country where life threatening hypothermia was thought to be a rare event. The case reports we’ll explore involve cardiac arrest events spanning six hours or more, with good neurological outcomes. We’ll examine the pathophysiology of hypothermia, key determinants of survival following hypothermic cardiac arrest, and the trauma system infrastructure (including ECMO) necessary to support successful outcomes. Objectives: develop awareness of the survivability of hypothermic cardiac arrest / understand of the pathophysiology of hypothermia / recognize knowledge of the key determinants affecting survival from hypothermic cardiac arrest / discuss the trauma system infrastructure (including ECMO) necessary to support successful outcomes.

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11:15 AM-12:15 PM CST

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AOR, Medical

EMSVax – What EMS Needs to Know About Vaccines and Testing in a COVID-World

Jeff Jarvis, MD, MS, EMT-P, FACEP, FAEMS

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Our lives, both professional and personal, have been turned upside down by the COVID-19 pandemic. Our best hope for a return of normalcy rests with mass vaccinations, yet there is much hesitancy among the EMS community about vaccinations. Traditionally, EMS education and practice haven’t focused on this topic, which has allowed fear and misinformation to cloud our collective consciousness about the best tool medicine has against viral disease. Dr. Jarvis will discuss the basic science (in a non-coma-inducing way, don’t worry) of immunology, how vaccines take advantage of our body’s immunity, and the results of the clinical trials of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. He’ll become downright giddy about the science behind the new mRNA vaccines. He’ll then close by discussing how rapid testing works, and how it can be used by agencies and education programs to decrease the spread of this virus. Objectives: describe the functions of antibodies, T-cells, and B-cells / describe the mechanism of action of various types of vaccines / describe the clinical data from trials about efficacy and adverse events / describe the types of rapid tests and how they work / describe the potential uses for rapid antigen tests in EMS.

CE: AOR or Medical

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11:15 AM-12:15 PM CST

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AOR, Special Considerations

Sleep Deprivation – It Is Part of the Job. So, What Can We Do About It?

Dean Campa, MA, LP, FP-C, EMS-CC(adv)

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It’s a known fact that a job in any Emergency Service position means sleep deprivation will occur. But what really is sleep deprivation? How does sleep deprivation affect both clinical and personal life decision-making? And are there long-term impacts on my health later in life? We will explore all these questions and discuss methods in which sleep deprivation can be mitigated even in Emergency Service providers. Objectives: define what constitutes sleep deprivation / understand how sleep deprivation impacts the decision-making process (cognitively and emotionally) / understand physical health impact of sleep deprivation / identify the strategies to employ to reduce sleep deprivation.

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11:15 AM-12:15 PM CST

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AOR, Special Considerations

Rural Community Paramedic

Bryan Welch, NRP

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Does a small county in Central Texas need a Community Paramedic? What would the Community Paramedic do? Come as we explore the answers to these and many other questions that we have come across in our journey to a rural Community Paramedic. Comanche is roughly 950 square miles with a total population of around 14000. We started a Community Paramedic program tailored toward rural needs. Come learn as we explore all success and failures we have faced to this point. Objectives: describe what a Community Paramedic in the rural setting looks like / identify roles of a Rural Community Paramedic in rural disasters / discuss surviving a pandemic with a Community Paramedic; identify the relationship between a Community Paramedic and our local Hospital.

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11:15 AM-12:15 PM CST

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Special Considerations

If You Didn’t Write It Down, It Never Happened

Paul Serino, MEd, NRP

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Designed to shine a light on one of the most frequently overlooked skills in a first responders toolbox: the critical ability to write a strong, detailed and accurate EMS report. This presentation will look at why EMS reporting is vital to both the patient, who depends on your words to accurately detail what happened to them before they reached the hospital: and, the provider, who depends on the words they choose to help defend their differential diagnosis and treatment decisions, as well as serving as a legal blanket in the event of a possible legal action. However, what is often overlooked is the importance of EMS reports to the profession as a whole. Quality assurance, EMS training, billing and research all depend on the accuracy and detail found in reports written by paramedics and EMTs. Objectives: discuss the importance of accuracy and detail for justifying a differential diagnosis and a first responder’s decisions on treatment and care / discuss the importance of quality EMS reporting to identify needs for EMS training / discuss how the profession benefits from research which is often influenced and initiated through EMS charting / discuss how EMS services stay successful and modern through their ability to become reimbursed, thanks in large part to quality EMS reporting.

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11:15 AM-12:15 PM CST

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Medical

Under Pressure: Hemodynamics TAAMS

Janet Taylor, CFRN, CCEMT-P

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Swan Ganz, Art Lines and CVP monitors aren’t commonly seen in EMS transport, but when doing critical care, it is expected that we know what to do and how to interpret the numbers to ensure quality patient care. In this presentation, we will go over the parameters of each item, including having hands-on sessions with actual Swan Ganz catheters, Art Lines, and CVP monitors to help you get an understanding of how to maintain the equipment and use the data for patient care. Objectives: define Stroke Volume, Cardiac Output, Preload and Afterload when using hemodynamic monitoring during transport / list three indications for an Arterial Line versus using “Cuff Pressures” to monitor blood pressure / differentiate between over-dampening and under-dampening on an Art Line waveform / demonstrate the steps in Zeroing a Transducer / explain where in the cardiac circulation a Central Venous Pressure is measured / differentiate between a PA pressure and a Wedge Pressure / differentiate the different shock states and what kinds of hemodynamics you will see with each one.

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11:15 AM-12:15 PM CST

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AOR, Clinically Related Operations

EMS Culture of Safety and Improvement  

William Leggio, EdD, NRP

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New to quality assurance, patient safety, and performance improvement? This lecture builds upon NREMT NCCP culture of safety content with additional content on improvement science. Information will be presented to introduce culture of safety and performance improvement, with a focus on EMS. Content will focus on practical steps for those new to quality assurance and system performance improvement. Objectives: define culture of safety / identify and explain the six core elements necessary to advance an EMS Culture of Safety / identify the role of the EMS providers in establishing a culture of safety within EMS organizations / identify steps for performance improvement within EMS organizations.

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11:15 AM-12:15 PM CST

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Medical

Prehospital IV Nitroglycerin for Acute Pulmonary Edema (APE): This Ain’t Monkey Business

Casey Patrick, MD, FAEMS

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Patients experiencing congestive heart failure (CHF) exacerbation with acute pulmonary edema (APE) require rapid preload and afterload reduction. Traditionally, prehospital treatment has been limited to sublingual nitroglycerin at doses that are not able to affect afterload. However, in the hospital setting, high dose, bolus intravenous (IV) nitroglycerin has improved patient morbidity and mortality. In this session, Dr. Casey Patrick will discuss how Montgomery County Hospital District EMS implemented a novel prehospital protocol to use bolus dose IV nitroglycerin for patients with APE. The safety, efficacy and impact of this prehospital approach to patients with APE will be discussed along with updating the current APE literature. Objectives: differentiate between three, specific CHF exacerbation diagnoses: acute pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock, and chronic volume overload / discuss the basic pathophysiology underlying acute pulmonary edema / identify major persistent myths in CHF care based on current acute pulmonary edema literature / describe the rationale behind an innovative prehospital acute pulmonary edema protocol utilizing nitroglycerin via intravenous bolus dosing.

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1:00-3:00 PM CST

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Medical

Hands-On Specialty Workshop

Stethoscopy for Dummies: An Ears on Experience

Bob Page, MEd, NRP, CCP, NCEE, CHSE, CHSOS

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How much did you pay for your stethoscope? How much training did you get on how to use it?  This will fill the gap. In this session, participants are provided down to earth “for dummies” information on various types of stethoscopes and how to use them to get the most out of patient assessment. In this “Ear Opening” session, new and improved methods and techniques are presented and lung sounds are also played aloud so all participants can hear the sounds rather than hear a “description” of the sound. Objectives: describe the parts of the stethoscope and the proper way to wear it / describe the difference in the bell vs the diaphragm and the use for each / identify by sound, common breath sounds / describe a technique for identifying consolidated lung tissue.

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1:00-3:00 PM CST

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Special Considerations

Hands-On Specialty Workshop

Caring for Special People: Unique Situations in EMS

Janet Taylor, CFRN, CCEMT-P

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Fortunately, for most patients with special needs, they and their caregivers are very knowledgeable on how to care for their special need(s). Unfortunately, by the time they call 9-1-1, they have tried everything they were taught, yet nothing has worked. It can be daunting to walk in and find a patient with equipment you aren’t familiar with or have a condition that you may or may not have learned about in paramedic or nursing school. We will go over the most common situations that instill fear in those who respond to a patient with a special need. We will go over and handle actual tracheostomy equipment, feeding tubes, Cerebral/Ventral Shunts, and dialysis catheters, and review the most common reasons for calling 9-1-1 in each of the situations. Objectives: list the steps in correcting a secretion- blocked tracheostomy device / differentiate between Nasogastric, Nasoduodenal and NasoJejunal tube as well as Gastric (PEG) tube and a Gastric Button device / explain why a Cerebral/Ventral Shunt is indicated and how it works / list at least 2 methods of increasing an Intracranial pressure in a patient with a ventral shunt.

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1:30-2:30 PM CST

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Airway, Clinically Related Operations

Critical Care 101: RSI, DSI and the Pit Crew Approach to Airway Management      

Kelly Grayson, AGS, NRP, CCP

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The Critical Care 101 series is intended to review critical concepts necessary to manage straightforward critical care patients. If you are a new or inexperienced critical care paramedic or nurse, or one with little formal training who is required to occasionally manage medically complex patients, this series is for you. Join Kelly Grayson as he discusses RSI, DSI, and a novel approach to airway management using the pit-crew concept. Objectives: compare and contrast rapid sequence induction (RSI) and delayed sequence induction (DSI) / discuss the necessity of adequate sedation and analgesia as an adjunct to neuromuscular blocking agents in airway management / understand the importance of the “resuscitate, then intubate” concept / discuss the importance of positioning and pre-oxygenation techniques, including PEEP and apneic oxygenation / apply the pit-crew concept to advanced airway management techniques.

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1:30-2:30 PM CST

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Medical, Trauma

Tales From the E.R. – Selected Case Studies   

Larry Torrey, RN, EMT-P

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We all know that strange things can happen in the world of emergency medicine, and it’s up to us to fix them! Come to this interactive class prepared to offer strategies to manage the patient problems described in these real-life E.R. scenarios. Objectives: discuss some non-traditional medical emergencies / identify the pathophysiology behind these events / discuss management techniques for these emergencies / identify the management variances presented by differing license levels and local resources.

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1:30-2:30 PM CST

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AOR, Preparatory

The Night I Almost Jumped: EMS Culture and EMS Suicide   

Matthew Giacopelli, BS, NR-P

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This is a look into some of the reasons why an EMS provider (or anyone in Emergency Services) may contemplate, and ultimately, complete suicide. The speaker will talk about his bout of depression and near-suicide. Case studies of EMS family members who have completed suicide will be presented. A discussion of the stigma surrounding mental health in EMS, and how we can break it, will ensue. The audience will then learn about coping mechanisms, and tips to take towards resiliency in themselves and those around them. Objectives: list some reasons why someone may contemplate suicide / discuss the stigma surrounding mental health in EMS / list coping mechanisms for the stress many EMS providers experience / list steps for resiliency.

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1:30-2:30 PM CST

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Patient Assessment, Preparatory

EMS Documentation: The Art of Constructing the Clinical Narrative           

Stephen Wirth, EMS Attorney, Paramedic

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The process of writing a complete, accurate and defensible clinical narrative is an art and a science. This session focuses on the process of producing a good clinical narrative so that ambulance revenue cycle professionals can gather all the information they need – the first time – to make timely and accurate billing decisions. We will focus on how field personnel should be constructing the ideal PCR narrative. This session will also cover the importance of clinical narratives in the age of electronic patient care, reporting, and discuss the SOAP and other formats for preparing a well-organized and chronological narrative. And we will provide practical strategies for improving the specificity of documentation so that a more accurate and descriptive picture of the patient is painted on the PCR. Objectives: describe the key elements of the patient care report (PCR) / discuss the difference between data fields and clinical narratives / list 3 reasons a clinical narrative is so essential to an effective PCR / describe formats for creating the clinical narrative and the essential elements of those formats.

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1:30-2:30 PM CST

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AOR, Preparatory

Showing Why You Are Worth Volunteering With?    

Bill Gardner, CFO, CFE, EMT-P

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The ability to compete for the time from people is difficult. In the day when people are trying to decide to volunteer time at PTA, little league, church, or food banks, how is your agency stacking up on the list of places to consider or commit the time? This presentation is designed to help you show compelling and fact-based data on how you make a difference, the value you have, and why it is important to volunteer at your agency. Additionally, millennials are the largest generation in the workforce, but many millennials may not even think of the fire or EMS service as an option to help the community and give back. We will present ways to understand, use, and show data including the number of people assisted in a given timeframe, risk reduction impacts to community and economy for small businesses, and data-driven development program, as well as an ability to have work-life balance. This part of a presentation done at the NVFC Summit. Objectives: receive information on what today’s largest workforce (Millennial) is looking for in employment/volunteer opportunities / receive information on what the fire/EMS service has to offer the Millennial workforce / learn to use your department’s data to show the social work environment, career development, health and well-being support, and social impact to the larger community from non-emergency services / learn the changes the fire service should make to recruit and prepare for more importantly retaining the workforce / discuss the attitudes and engagement of Gen Z as they are entering the workforce.

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1:30-2:30 PM CST

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AOR, Preparatory

Ancient Wisdom for the EMS Professional 

Jeff Anderson, NRP

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EMS professionals face many challenges while building a career in our profession. The purpose of this presentation is to apply wisdom from ancient philosophy to some of the problems commonly faced by EMS professionals. Objectives: discuss the influence of ancient philosophy on modern mental health treatments / identify things that are in their control and things that are not / reframe problems to make them more manageable / recognize red flags that should prompt seeking professional help.

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1:30-2:30 PM CST

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Medical, Trauma

Beyond the Rule of Nines: Critical Care for Thermal Injuries

Nanci Nagel, DHSc RN ACNP-BC

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Burns continue to be a low frequency but high acuity type of injury. This lecture will explore the unique physiologic changes associated with thermal injuries. Different types of thermal injuries will be explained and treatment considerations for on scene and interfacility transfers will be addressed. Attendees will leave with a solid understanding of burn treatment and the why behind it. Objectives: identify unique fluid and electrolyte needs of the burn patient / determine fluid resuscitation requirements for adults and pediatrics / explain the cardiac concerns associated with electrical injuries / list some of the new treatments in the long-term care of burns.

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1:30-2:30 PM CST

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Trauma

Controlling the Flow: Hemorrhage Control for the Pre-Hospital Environment   

Kevin Ramdayal, Deputy Chief

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This lecture takes an in depth look at hemorrhage control in the pre-hospital environment. Utilizing a case study based approach on real world incidents we will compare and contrast the appropriate measures and techniques of bleeding control for the everyday provider. We will review common and not-so common fluid administration indications and contraindications for a variety of patients. Objectives: recall the basics of pre-hospital hemorrhage control / learn common training techniques that once can utilize to master hemorrhage control / review relevant case studies in order to prepare yourself for the future operations / review fluid administration and the overall efficacy within pre-hospital and the hospital environment

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1:30-2:30 PM CST

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Patient Assessment

Little Lambs and The Wolves Hiding

Christopher Suprun, NRP, FP-C

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This session is about the wolves in sheep’s clothing waiting to pounce on the unsuspecting provider. This session is a pediatric case study program that will cover medical and trauma related situations that are not as innocent as we would like them to be. Providers should come prepared to question their own assumptions and care plan, as well as the case itself. Objectives: identify assessment keys with the pediatric population / discuss atypical avenues to achieve clinical objectives, i.e., lung sounds, blood pressures, etc. / list normal traits by age group using typical benchmarks / consider assessment steps to ensure pediatric assessment.

 

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3:15-4:15 PM CST

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Medical, Patient Assessment

Picking Wildflowers in a Mine Field – Procedural Errors When Caring for the Critically Ill

Scotty Bolleter, BS, EMT-P

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Skills related mistakes are common. In fact, they are often unwittingly associated with engrained misunderstandings, medical lore, and training dogma. Today’s engaging discussion will cover why selected skills are currently employed (with a brief, yet relevant history), the human anatomy associated with these procedures (including the good, bad, and ugly), the procedure itself (as well as the “micro-skills” needed within each task), and finally, an evidence driven, experience based discussion to help us mitigate skills related challenges. This lecture will target hemorrhage control, airway management, circulatory access, and thoracic injury care. The only real question needing an answer before coming to our talk: Are these skills really that difficult; or do we just suck at it? Either way, this lecture’s faculty is coming with evidence, experience, and solutions to make things better.

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3:15-4:15 PM CST

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Special Considerations

What Lessons has EMS Learned from the COVID-19 Pandemic?

Matt Zavadsky, MS-HSA, NREMT

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The Coronavirus has changed our world, and EMS delivery, forever. EMS’ role in the communities we serve, how we care for our workforce, and our approach to patient care delivery have been dramatically transformed as a result of the pandemic. What have been the major lessons for EMS through the COVID-19 pandemic, and how can we leverage these lessons to enhance the EMS transformation? This direct, realistic, humorous, and at times controversial discussion will help attendees understand the positive ways the pandemic can shape the future of EMS delivery. Objectives: understand the ways COVID-19 has changed the roles of EMS / understand the ways COVID-19 has impacted the EMS workforce / learn the partnerships that can be/have been created to help EMS agencies / learn the national, state and local partnerships created during the pandemic.

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3:15-4:15 PM CST

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Airway, Medical

FaceTime: Neck Deep in Emergencies

William Ferguson, MD, FAEMS

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Of all the emergent conditions the emergency provider can face, none can strike fear or anxiety in the mind of the provider more than those of the head and neck. This course will discuss acute emergencies of the head and neck that an emergency medical provider may encounter. Discussion will include the pathophysiology of both the prehospital and emergency department treatment of upper airway obstructions as well as selected facial, ocular, and ENT emergencies. Objectives: understand relevant physician exam findings and pathophysiology related to ophthalmological emergencies that impact and/or change the direction of patient care in the emergency department / understand relevant physician exam findings and pathophysiology related to selected ENT emergencies that impact and/or change the direction of patient care in the emergency department / gain a basic understanding acute medical and traumatic emergent conditions of the neck Including the pathophysiology and acute treatment of said injuries and potential mechanisms of injury / gain a basic understanding of acute emergencies involving the head and face, including the pathophysiology and acute treatment of said injuries.

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3:15-4:15 PM CST

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Patient Assessment, Trauma

Case Reviews for the Advanced Provider-Version 6.0       

David Sanko, BA, NRP

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Each participant will be given selected actual case review presentations for the ALS provider (I can’t make this stuff up; I am not that creative, and fact far outweighs fiction). These are all actual CNS-specific trauma cases to test even the most experienced provider. Each participant will be given the patient’s presentation from the EMS perspective, and then the case will be followed through the hospital course on to discharge. When available, participants will be given actual EKG tracings, scene photos, radiographic films, lab values, radio reports, and assessments to determine the case progression. Compare your treatment plan to what transpired. See if your patient would have survived. This will be an interactive course with plenty of audience participation. Objectives: discuss and review the assessment and treatment modalities for a variety of medical cases / discuss and review the assessment and treatment modalities for a variety of trauma cases / discuss treatment options for isolated extremity fractures / review Sepsis criteria and identify treatment options.

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3:15-4:15 PM CST

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AOR, Preparatory

Rural Industrial Pre-Planning & Response             

Michael Dane Youngblood, Vice President, EMT-P

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Many rural departments, volunteer and paid, have industrial construction, oil & gas, or petrochemical locations in their response area. i.e., compressor stations, meter stations, pump jack locations, SWD locations.  Many of these departments or responders are not aware of the pre-planning that is available to them or how to find the proper contacts during the construction and then processing phases.  My class will teach a greater level of awareness and understanding to the pre-planning and response phases for these locations.  We will cover how to find the correct contacts, identify the proper questions to ask in order to get the information needed for their area and better understand the chains of communication within the contacts and management of those response locations. Objectives: learn increased awareness of the need to understand the response location / learn to visually identify the type of location and the product being processed by the structure and equipment that is onsite / learn who’s who on those sites / learn the communication structure of the onsite personnel and identify which ones they need to be talking to.

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3:15-4:15 PM CST

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Medical, Patient Assessment

Sepsis in the Elderly: The Silent Tsunami

Gary Saffer, MPA, NRP

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Sepsis is a leading cause of death in elderly patients. Hospitals are establishing programs to discover, and rapidly treat septic patients. EMS is lagging far behind hospitals in recognition and appropriate treatment of septic patients. In this program we will discuss the pathophysiology of sepsis, as well as assessment and treatment strategies. We will look at the epidemiology of sepsis to understand why it should become an EMS priority. Objectives: explain the pathophysiology of sepsis / describe the signs and symptoms of sepsis / identify treatment priorities for sepsis at both the BLS and ALS levels / discuss why early treatment and early hospital notification are important parts of the treatment plan.

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3:15-4:15 PM CST

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Airway, Medical

Top 10 Critical Care Rants

Tony Garcia, MS, MSN, ACNP, FNP, ACCNS, CFRN, LP

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This workshop will explore some of the nuances of critical care learned by the speaker over many years. The discussion will be exploratory and collaborative to share experiences with the purpose of improving patient care. Objectives: discuss types of shock and appropriate management / evaluate components of effective airway management / analyze parameters of normal and abnormal cardiovascular hemodynamics / describe physical examination “”clues”” for rapid patient assessment.

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3:15-4:15 PM CST

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Medical, Special Considerations

Psyched Out: Taking the Crazy Out of Behavioral Emergencies     

Adam Parkhurst, Paramedic

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Psychiatric Emergencies can be a difficult call for emergency responders. With the number of unknown variables and the possible volatility of the situation, these calls can create a risk to patients and responders alike. This course looks to review the types of mental health emergencies that are most often encountered – and a few less-common ones – and seeks to improve understanding to provide for a safer and more effective treatment plan. We will work to remove some of the taboos associated with mental illness, so we can continue to provide the best care possible for these individuals. Objectives: review statistics surrounding mental illness / look at the most common types of behavioral emergencies we may encounter / discuss treatment and transport options / discuss common medication prescribed and their effect.

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3:15-4:15 PM CST

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Patient Assessment

Aerial EMS: Patient Assessment at a Distance     

Jules Scadden, Paramedic/Director of EMS

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Scenes size up and general impressions and the primary assessment all often initiated prior to actually reaching the patient in a trauma. Can’t this also be done with medical patients? This interactive presentation will allow the audience to perform patient assessment, form differential diagnoses, determine transport criteria, and begin to outline patient management using an “aerial view’ from scene descriptions and photos from incidents. Objectives: discuss the use of the patient assessment triangle in both pediatric and adult patient interactions / describe how mechanism of injury and nature of illness can set the path to differential diagnosis / explain visual assessment vs physical assessment techniques /explore scenario photos to begin patient assessment and determine differential diagnoses.”

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3:15-4:15 PM CST

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Patient Assessment, Trauma

It’s Just a Lift Assist Right?

Taylor Ratcliff, MD, FACEP, FAEMS, FF/EMT-LP

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This one-hour lecture is targeted at all levels of EMS providers who answer 911 calls for the dreaded lift assist! This lecture will discuss how frequent these calls really are, and highlight statistically how common injuries are, including some missed subtle injuries! We will discuss common practice vs. best practice, which will help identify missed injury and illness, and reduce the provider and agency’s liability with missing those things. Objectives: discuss the frequency of lift assist calls / list common missed injuries or illness related to the fall / identify ways to minimize missed injury and illness related to these calls / evaluate their lift assist policy and consider validation or revision.

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4:30-5:30 PM CST

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Patient Assessment, Trauma

Household Haz-Mat “Under the Kitchen Sink”

Ken Bouvier, NREMT, Paramedic, Professional Speaker

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When you think of hazardous materials, you think of chemicals like sulfuric acid, gasoline, propane, ammonia, and chlorine. You probably do not consider nail polish, hair spray, drain cleaner, and mothballs a hazardous material.  During this session we will discuss the most common products that are kept “Under the Kitchen Sink”! This session is designed to inform First Responders, EMT’, Paramedics, Nurses, and Physicians of the dangers of Household Hazmat. We will look at how people become injured while using common household products that are stored under the kitchen sink and discuss how small children are often exposed by accident. We will discuss both BLS and ALS treatment of exposure to “Everything Under the Kitchen Sink”. Objectives: inform First Responders, EMT’s, Paramedics, Nurses, and Physicians about the dangers of Household Hazmat / discuss the most common products stored “Under the Kitchen Sink” / discuss how people are injured while using household chemicals / explain how children are injured and exposed while playing under the sink / discuss both Basic and Advanced Life Support for exposure to Household Hazmat.

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4:30-5:30 PM CST

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Airway

A Modern Approach to Basic Airway Management

Eric Jaeger, EMS Instructor Coordinator, Paramedic, EMS Educator

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It’s time to rethink our approach to basic airway management. We’ll discuss a series of approaches to airway management that, taken together, offer a modified approach to severe respiratory distress that may be significantly more effective than our current approach. These include increased use of PEEP, expanding indications for CPAP, as well as innovations that are rapidly gaining favor in the hospital environment such as high flow nasal cannula. Objectives: understand the importance of positioning in managing respiratory distress / understand when to get aggressive in managing severe respiratory distress / describe the importance of PEEP in managing respiratory distress / demonstrate knowledge of how to effectively use PEEP with conscious and unconscious patients.

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4:30-5:30 PM CST

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Medical, Patient Assessment

That Gut Feeling

Chris Ebright, BEd, NRP

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We all did it when we were younger, right? You didn’t feel like going to school, so you tried your best to convince your parents that you were just too sick. Faking a stomachache was one of the easiest things to try, and sometimes it was effective. But what about that patient who truly has abdominal pain? Assessing it is one of the easiest, but also one of the hardest things to do. This presentation will discuss the assessment of various abdominal ailments and corresponding EMS management. Objectives: list the contents of the 4 abdominal quadrants / contrast visceral and parietal abdominal pain / explain what is meant by referred pain / discuss common abdominal ailments.

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4:30-5:30 PM CST

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Medical, Patient Assessment

Fun with Physiology: Let’s Get Cellular   

Bob Matoba, EMT-P, MEd

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There is a good chance you were taught cellular physiology in a very academic manner.  This session will address cellular “action potentials” in a manner that is anything but academic.  Interactive case studies will illustrate how cellular action potentials can become an intuitive concept for every level of EMS provider.  More importantly, participants will understand how diseases influences cellular action potentials, and outwardly reflect specific signs and symptoms in their patients. Objectives: identify the basic elements of cellular action potentials / describe why understanding cellular action potentials relates to all EMS providers / integrate the “School House Theory” into their understanding of normal and abnormal human physiology / describe how cellular physiology can be applied to their clinical practice.

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4:30-5:30 PM CST

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Patient Assessment, Special Considerations

Rural Health Care and Critical Access Hospitals

Bryan Welch, NRP

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During this lecture I will cover some aspects of critical care hospitals, the rules and regulations for the hospitals, and how they can affect EMS. I will offer solutions to problems that I have found in dealing with Rural EMS and Critical Care Hospitals. Objectives: describe a Critical Access Hospital and how they differ from other hospital types / identify EMS’s role in a Critical Access Hospital from our perspective / understand the difference in mechanisms of injuries (Rural Vs City) / discuss treatment and transport decisions.

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4:30-5:30 PM CST

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Preparatory, Special Considerations

Love Shouldn’t Hurt: Continued Care of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Victims

Kiersten Robinson, Paramedic

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Continuing my presentation from last year, this lecture will focus on the continued care of domestic violence and sexual assault victims. I will be focusing on mental health (for both the patient and ourselves), and resources that we, as EMS providers, can provide to our patients while they are in our care. Objectives: recognize the need for continued care / understand mental health emergencies and how they apply to domestic violence/sexual assault victims / discuss how to cope with domestic violence/sexual assault calls as providers / recognize situational awareness and how it applies to continued care of domestic violence and sexual assault victims.

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4:30-5:30 PM CST

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Airway, Patient Assessment

Swelled Up Like a Toad in a Texas Rainstorm: Severe Allergic Reactions and Anaphylaxis

Nanci Nagel, DHSc RN ACNP-BC

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This lecture will delve deep into hypersensitivity reactions and anaphylaxis. This will focus on dysregulated or uncontrolled responses to foreign antigens and the associated tissue damage. It will include: the types of hypersensitivity reactions, physiologic responses, and appropriate treatment guidelines (to include venom immunotherapy). There will also be some discussion on how immune responses may be directed against self-antigens as a result of the failure of self-tolerance (autoimmunity). Objectives: define hypersensitivity reaction / describe types of hypersensitivity reactions / explain the pathophysiologic mechanism / identify appropriate treatment.

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4:30-5:30 PM CST

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Preparatory

Top 5 EMS Research and Quality Improvement Abstracts of 2021

David Wampler, PhD, LP, FAEMS

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This will be a fast-paced series of selected speakers that submitted the five best abstracts submitted for the Texas EMS Conference Research Forum. You will hear directly from the investigators that are at the forefront of EMS Innovation. You will see the latest science, and maybe get an idea to bring back to your organization. Objectives: gain insight into current research projects being conducted by Texas EMS Researchers / learn how current research projects are designed to ask questions / demystify EMS Research / build relationships for the responsible conduct of Texas EMS Research.