Course Descriptions

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To View A Complete List of Speakers, Visit The 2020 Conference Speakers Page

Special note concerning CE earned through Texas EMS Conference 2020 – Virtual: All continuing education hours earned during the virtual event November 23-25, may be used as “live” continuing education for recertification with the National Registry of EMTs. All continuing education hours claimed by participating in the Video-On-Demand feature must be counted as distributive education when used for recertification hours with the National Registry of EMTs.

Monday

Is EMS Harming Their Most Vulnerable Patients? Techniques for Neonatal and Infant Manual Ventilation

Monday, November 23; 9:25-10:25 am

The first bag-valve-mask (Ambu Bag) was manufactured and marketed in the late 1950s and has been a staple of EMS since then. Manual ventilation is considered a BLS skill, however no one ever said it was an easy skill. If not used properly a BVM can be the most dangerous piece of equipment used in EMS today, especially in the neonatal and infant population. This session will explain the differences, pros and cons and proper technique of the self-inflating bag or BVM, flow-inflating or hyperinflation bag and the T-piece resuscitator. Is EMS using what’s best or just what they have always done?

Steven LeCroy, MA, CRT, EMTP

Spinning Dials: Pediatric Mechanical Ventilation

Monday, November 23; 9:25-10:25 am

Transporting children often increases our anxiety as providers, and placing a pediatric patient on a ventilator adds even more stress. Together we will review the important ways in which we must modify our approach to mechanical ventilation for pediatric and neonatal populations, and address challenging situations with simple, usable learning points. Each case will highlight challenging physiology, common-sense solutions, and an evidence-based approach.

Bryan Winchell, EMT-P, FP-C, CCRN, C-NPT

Navigating the Perfect Storm: Lower Call Volume, Less Revenue, Budget Cuts

Monday, November 23; 9:25-10:25 am

The unthinkable has happened! After decades of economic prosperity, rising call volumes and revenue, and healthcare growth, the world changed–overnight. Call volumes are down, sales taxes have tanked, and thousands of EMS and public safety jobs are on the line. Remember when there was a paramedic shortage? How can you leverage new EMS roles and value to gain economic stability, prevent layoffs and maintain relevance in your community? Dramatic change may have to occur. This session will walk the participants through steps they can take to be good partners to their community leaders and enhance their value to the community.

Matt Zavadsky, MS-HSA, NREMT

Getting the Patient to Like You: It Starts with Taking Care of Yourself

Monday, November 23; 9:25-10:25 am

The vast majority of complaints and lawsuits against EMS agencies have nothing to do with negligence–but a lot to do with attitude. Studies show that patients don’t sue you if they like you–they sue you if you have a poor attitude! So how do you get the patient to like you? It’s easy to say that you have to be kind and compassionate. But you can’t be kind and compassionate unless you are physically and mentally up to the task! This humorous and life-changing presentation will help you better understand how we each have the power to make every patient interaction a positive experience for both the patient and the EMS caregiver. You’ll learn six essential steps you can take now to improve your attitude and to be better prepared to make every patient experience a meaningful one, and help bring joy back into your EMS work and your life.

Stephen Wirth, Attorney, Paramedic

Top 5 EMS Research and Quality Improvement

Monday, November 23; 9:25-10:25 am

This will be a fast-paced series of selected speakers that submitted the best of all of the abstracts submitted for the Texas EMS Conference Research Forum. You will hear directly from the investigators that are at the forefront of EMS innovation. You will see the latest science, and maybe get an idea to bring back to your organization.

David Wampler, PhD, LP, FAEMS

Instructional Scaffolding: Supporting Students Not Buildings

Monday, November 23; 9:25-10:25 am

What if you could improve your skill as an instructor? What if you could increase the efficiency of how students learn and contextualize concepts? What if you could double the instructional concepts that students can learn? And, what if you could accomplish ALL these things WITHOUT increasing instructional class hours. A nationally accredited paramedic program has accomplished these outcomes through integrating an instructional scaffolding curriculum model. This session will highlight instructional scaffolding and how they integrated scaffolding into their program. The session will also provide opportunity to address how instructional scaffolding might be integrated into your programs.

Bob Matoba, M.Ed., EMT-P

Rural EMS: Unique Documentation and Compliance Challenges

Monday, November 23; 9:25-10:25 am

Distance, time and resource availability plague rural providers. When a small ER that doesn’t have what the critical patient needs, is transfer to a better facility an emergency? Or is that trip a non-emergency? Often rural ground transports need to connect with air providers–what needs to be noted in trip reports for those transports? Documentation compliance is important whether a rural or urban provider. Good billing follows good documentation and leads to better billing decisions. This session addresses the unique issues faced by rural services and provides tips on quality documentation and billing to maintain compliance.

Maggie Adams, BBA

Operational K9 Care for EMS Providers

Monday, November 23; 9:25-10:25 am

This lecture is developed to inform EMS personnel and agencies across the State of Texas in supporting prehospital canine care of law enforcement K9s. This topic area highlights the best practices in the development of EMS agency canine protocols, with an emphasis in rural EMS agencies, to prevent death and disability to injured police K9s. Special emphasis will be aimed towards planning, scene control for “handler down” situation, and initial basic life support interventions while preparing to transport the injured canine to a veterinary facility. Rural EMS agencies are at a disadvantage due to operational requirements and lack of adequate local resources which place a burden on rendering canine care.

The Texas Operational Canine Care Committee, partnered with 22 agencies across Texas, was developed in 2019 stemming from the lack of standardization in prehospital canine care and the only availability of “Tactical” medical guidelines that did not apply to EMS services in non-tactical environments. TOCCC is working with the newly forming National Association of Veterinary EMS and the University of Texas Health Science Center – San Antonio EMS Physician Fellowship for national development of these best practices.

Rick Maricle, BAAS, NRP, FP-C

Medical Directors Gone Wild – A “Live” Podcast

Monday, November 23; 9:25-10:25 am

Do you like your science served up with a bit of snark? Perhaps a nice, academic no-holds-barred debate on the literature guiding our clinical practice? If so, come see Ginger Locke attempt to rein in a panel of highly opinionated EMS physicians in a wide-ranging discussion of the key topics of the day. Topics are likely to change to assure they are “hot-off-the-presses” current, but are likely to include cardiac arrest management, medications, and airway management.

Jeff Jarvis, MD, EMT-P

Ginger Locke, EMT-P

Taylor Ratcliff, MD, FACEP, FAEMS, FF/EMT-P

Emily Kidd, MD, FACEP, FAEMS

Jason Pickett, MD, EMT-P

Heidi Abraham, MD, EMT-B/T

Stethoscopy for Dummies: Ears of Workshop!- Interactive Workshop

Monday, November 23: 9:30 – 11:30 am

Back by Popular demand! This highly touted practical stethoscopy class is being offered once again! How much did you pay for your stethoscope? How much training did you get on how to use it? This will fill the gap. In this session, participants are provided down to earth “for dummies” information on various types of stethoscopes and how to use them to get the most out of patient assessment. In this “Ear Opening” session, new and improved methods and techniques are presented. Participants will get to hear breath sounds with their stethoscopes rather than hear a “description” of the sound. Participants must bring their own stethoscopes with them. Bob brings simulators for all participants to use their own stethoscopes to hear the various sounds. There is even a test at the end of class to see who earns the right to wear the stethoscope!

Bob Page, M.Ed., NRP, CCP, NCEE

Special Note: To increase your involvement and maximize your educational return from this interactive workshop, participants may want to purchase a stethoscope sounder (speaker) to plug into the computer. This will allow participants to hear sounds as if attending a live event. Sounders are available for purchase from Pinnacle Technology Group (https://pinnacletec.com/product/stethoscope-sounder/). Please contact Chris Sell (csell@pinnacletec.com or 800-345-5123 X 120) for more information or to place an order. If you mention you are taking Bob Page’s class at the 2020 Texas EMS Conference you will receive a 10% discount. Please allow 7-10 days for delivery of the sounder.

Catch Me If You Can! Subtle STEMI

Monday, November 23; 10:55-11:55 am

Wouldn’t it be convenient if every acute MI patient presented with freakishly huge ST elevation, making for a slam-dunk diagnosis every time? Wouldn’t it also be convenient if the ECG computer interpretation nailed the diagnosis of STEMI every time? The realities are that many patients with acute coronary occlusion (ACO) have minimal (or no) ST elevation, and the computer interpretation is far from perfect. This presentation explores several cases of ACO that were either missed completely, or that would have been missed without serial ECGs.

Stephen Rahm, NRP

Zip Code Shouldn’t Define Your Level of Care: Improving Clinical Standards in the Rural EMS Environment

Monday, November 23; 10:55-11:55 am

In this lecture, attendees will gather the key concepts to assist a rural agency in transforming their level of care to the most recent evidence-based standards. The presenter will share his personal experience in transforming an EMS system’s clinical guidelines (aka protocols) from an outdated 1990s version to current evidence-guided practice. Too often, EMS providers utilize the excuse of “We are too rural,” or “We’ve always done it this way” due to their geographic area. The emphasis on progressive prehospital care should be focused more heavily in the rural environments as these providers are the best if not the only version of emergency care available to the citizens that they serve. From cardiac arrest management, to drug-assisted intubation, to prehospital whole-blood transfusion, the presenter will define the steps taken along the way to ensure a successful EMS system. The lecture will consist of providing insight in to developing comprehensive (and up to date) clinical guidelines, provider credentialing, quality assurance, continuing education and good medical direction/oversight.

Casey Ebrom, EMT-P, FP-C

There Is More than Critical Thinking! A Review of Higher Order Thinking

Monday, November 23; 10:55-11:55 am

As educators, we all have used the critical thinking phrase. Critical thinking is just one element of higher order thinking! Come for a quick review of Bloom’s Taxonomy and stay explore application of higher order thinking in EMS education!

William Leggio, EdD, NRP

When Tipsy Doesn’t Mean Trashed

Monday, November 23; 10:55-11:55 am

There are medical conditions that make a patient appear to act intoxicated. However, one can’t always assume, based on behavior alone, that a patient has been drinking or has been using drugs. If he or she displays certain abnormal behaviors, it could indicate a serious medical condition that may worsen if the EMS professional just writes them off as “another drunk.” This presentation will highlight the common intoxication mimics and how the EMS professional can differentiate them so as to provide proper and timely management.

Chris Ebright, B.Ed., NRP

Oh, the Pressure! Which Vasopressor Should I Choose?

Monday, November 23; 10:55-11:55 am

Often during the management of critical patients, clinicians are put into a situation in which the must choose to initiate or titrate vasopressors. During the past 15 years of educating new flight crew members, the questions are often asked, “Which pressor do I choose?” or “How do I know which one to titrate?” This lecture will discuss the pathophysiology of shock and appropriate vasopressor(s) one should choose to manage the critically ill patient.

Melissa Kendrick, RN, BSN, MBA/MHA, CFRN, LP

Tracking and Trending Patient/Customer Complaints

Monday, November 23; 10:55-11:55 am

A major component of EMS is customer service and service recovery. In our everyday interactions with a variety of stakeholders we have the ability to improve our relationships. As EMS providers, our patient interactions can happen quickly, and at times patients report lost items (dentures, medications, insurance cards, etc.), negative interactions and other operational concerns. Tracking and trending these interactions can improve customer service, service recovery, and have unexpected financial implications. A review of how the Montgomery County Hospital District captured this data and improved their customer service process can provide an example for operational process improvement.

James Campbell, NRP, FACPE

Code 3: Is the Risk Worth the Reward?

Monday, November 23; 10:55-11:55 am

If you have spent any amount of time in the EMS industry, you likely remember the days of going “Code 3” to everything. While Code 3 runs are becoming less common, they are still prevalent in many systems. We will look at research surrounding emergent responses and talk about the risk they pose to providers, patients and the public. We will talk about the reasons for these responses and discuss whether they are even warranted in current models. Perhaps the time has come for the Code 3 response to go the way of Mast Pants.

Reuben Farnsworth, BS, CCP-C, CP-C, NRP

Kids & Sports Injuries

Monday, November 23; 10:55-11:55 am

This session will help first responders, EMTs, paramedics, nurses and physicians better understand sports injuries and how they occur at local playgrounds. During this session we will take a look at some of the most common types of playground injuries involving kids and teenagers, from Little League through high school. We will review how children are often injured while riding bicycles and skateboards, playing baseball, football, basketball and soccer. We will discuss the treatment for sprains, strains and injuries caused by repetitive sports. We will also discuss sports related trauma calls such as fractures, head injuries and blunt trauma. We will review the types of medical and trauma emergencies that also happen in the grandstands and concession area. We will discuss both BLS and ALS treatment for specific sports injuries.

Ken Bouvier, NREMT-Paramedic

Basics of Negligence for EMS

Monday, November 23; 10:55-11:55 am

EMS providers are routinely scared by stories of liability and negligence. However, a four-hour medical legal class during initial EMS education rarely provides an understanding of law and liability. Unfortunately, legal issues are rarely taught by a subject matter expert. This class will use a couple of recent stories from EMS publications to discuss how negligence laws are actually applied.

Wes Ogilvie, MPA, JD, LP, NRP

Breaking Boundaries in Appropriate Care for the Homeless: The Acute Care Station at Haven for Hope

Monday, November 23; 1:00-2:00 pm

The Acute Care Station began in July 2018 and is a program in which San Antonio Fire Department Mobile Integrated Healthcare (MIH) paramedics are staffed at the Haven for Hope campus overnight 7 days a week with the mission to intercept 9-1-1 or potential 9-1-1 calls and navigate those patients to the appropriate level of care. Haven for Hope is the largest homeless shelter in the San Antonio area and holds an average of 1400 people on campus each day. The campus was at one point the number one origination point for 9-1-1 EMS calls and an estimated 1,800 transports annually were happening prior to the establishment of the Acute Care Station. The Acute Care Station project has been responsible for cutting those transport percentages down by half and working together with other partners has been able to navigate patients into primary care appointments, urgent care clinics and other referral locations rather than to the local emergency rooms. This presentation will review the program and metrics used to measure success as well as explain how the program was able to get local organizations to work together towards the same goal.

Kellie Burnam, Licensed Paramedic

Chris Velasquez, Paramedic

Molly Biglari

Alternatives to ET3: How to Build, Sustain and Get Paid for Community Paramedicine

Monday, November 23; 1:00-2:00 pm

ET3 shows great promise, but it is not for everyone. What’s more, ET3 is a pilot program targeted to approximately 30 percent of the Medicare population; most EMS companies serve many kinds of patients beyond Medicare. The pilot has not yet begun and is set to run for five years. Yet the need is now, and many organizations are already providing some form of community paramedicine. Attend this session and learn what options exist today for growth, sustainment and payment of community paramedicine services.

Maggie Adams, BBA

All Jacked Up

Monday, November 23; 1:00-2:00 pm

This lecture will hit home with almost all of the audience. This not just an educational talk about the effects of energy drinks on our patients. This is also a talk about how it affects YOU! First responders chronically use energy drinks to power through their shifts, but what is the consequence? Are there any benefits? Let’s find out as we go through the physiologic effects of the drinks/supplements and how to mitigate them appropriately.

Brandon Heggie

5 Ways to Save Your Volunteer Organization

Monday, November 23; 1:00-2:00 pm

Can volunteerism in EMS survive? It is a question frequently asked in EMS magazines and at national conferences. Texas has a high percentage of volunteer organizations with high quality, dedicated individuals. This presentation focuses on optimizing volunteer organizations to match the needs of both the organization and the people served. Designed to address challenging realities with a practical and hopeful approach, this presentation is for leaders and members of volunteer organizations who want to continue and excel for many years to come.

Daniel Limmer, AS, Paramedic, I/C

Hulk Smash! What the Avengers Taught Us about Treating Excited Delirium

Monday, November 23; 1:00-2:00 pm

He’s huge, he’s incoherent, he gets stronger the madder he gets, and he’s green… okay, so maybe he’s not green. But he definitely knows only “Hulk smash!” as his modus operandi, and you can either soothe the savage beast like only Natasha Romanoff can, or you can take the more direct, Tony Stark approach with his Hulk Buster suit. Which is appropriate for the situation? Join Kelly Grayson as he discusses how to deal with The Hulk, so you don’t wind up like Loki.

Steven “Kelly” Grayson, AGS, NRP, CCP

When Is It My Patient? The Trials and Tribulations of Teamwork

Monday, November 23; 1:00-2:00 pm

This lecture will focus on one of the most dangerous clinical times in all of medicine–the patient turnover! The time surrounding turnover of care from a ground EMS crew to the flight crew can be perilous. Both providers are busy providing clinical care to what is usually a very sick patient while addressing logistics of patient packaging and movement to leave the scene. This lecture will address pearls and pitfalls of good communication, teamwork and safe patient care transfer.

Taylor Ratcliff, MD, FACEP, FAEMS, FF/EMT-LP

Discriminatory Item Analysis, a Test Administrators Best Friend!

Monday, November 23; 1:00-2:00 pm

Determining if a test question is valid can be a daunting challenge for any educator. What if you could determine the validity of a test question without looking at the question? Discriminatory item analysis allows the instructor to use data, rather than feelings, to validate test questions. This interactive session will illustrate how discriminatory item analysis can be used by an instructor who administers formative written tests.

Bob Matoba, M.Ed., EMT-P

Rural EMS: You Don’t See This in the Movies

Monday, November 23; 1:00-2:00 pm

Rural EMS has taken a backseat to urban EMS systems since prehospital care has been available. This lecture will discuss the challenges and pitfalls of rural EMS and offer possible solutions to those difficult and often overlooked problems. Some of the solutions will be controversial, such as the use of telemedicine, advanced practice paramedicine, and expanded-scope BLS care. The lecture will also discuss equipment and ambulance configurations that make sense for the rural environment where their crews are often long on distance and short on personnel. Case studies will be briefly discussed on developing remote first responder teams in other countries and how they may lead to involvement of more of the community in the rural EMS system. Finally, a short discussion of technologies that are available to assist rural EMS systems and what we can expect in the coming years.

Larry Hill, BA, MAG, LP, CCP, DMT, FP

Eloy Garcia Mondragon, MD

EMS Serial Killers – Altered Mental Status

Monday, November 23; 1:00-2:00 pm

We often start with an emergent diagnosis and teach from there – for example, stroke and encephalopathy are common AMS educational topics. But, how to get to that final diagnosis is often a process that all levels of emergency providers struggle with. To go from a chaotic scene with an altered patient with unstable vitals then filter to a differential of #1 intoxication, #2 hypoglycemia, #3 intracranial hemorrhage is often quite challenging. The “Serial Killer Series” targets the most common EMS chief complaints and the killer diagnoses that you should always consider. We’re not going to spend time with non-emergent/chronic diagnoses, just the ones that are deadly when missed. That’s where we, as emergency providers, must begin. Dr. Patrick will address the top 5 Altered Mental Status deadly diagnoses with Dr. Dickson adding specific emphasis on stroke management and sub-types.

Casey Patrick, MD, FAEMS

Robert Dickson, MD, FAEMS

Basics of Transport Ventilators and Ventilator Management: Ventilator Beginner Course – Interactive Workshop

Monday, November 23; 1:00 – 4:00 pm

Ventilators remain one of the most challenging skills and competencies to master, yet ventilation and oxygenation is one of the most important things we do! This course will give you the knowledge and confidence to silence the alarming ventilator and your fear of the equipment. This basic ventilation course is for transport ventilator novices looking to become more familiar with basic ventilator management, as well as for the experienced clinicians looking to reinforce their basic knowledge of transport ventilators.

Juan Mejias, NRP, FPC

Jay Lance Kovar

CJ Lance

First Response with Older Adults: A Comprehensive Training for First Responders

Monday, November 23; 2:30-3:30 pm

Currently 5.5 million adults age 60 and older call Texas home, with 14 percent of them located in rural areas. EMS and other first responders often interact with older adults with complex needs and at vulnerable moments in their lives. As this population continues to grow, it is important that first responders across the state have access to quality, comprehensive training to enhance their responses to older adults in crisis. The Health and Human Services Commission and Department of State Health Services have developed a web-based training on the common issues older adults experience and things to consider when working with an older adult. This session will provide an overview of the training and its key components.

Olivia Burns, MSW

Holly Riley

Joseph W. Schmider

Empowered EMS Through Reflection and Student Motivation

Monday, November 23; 2:30-3:30 pm

This session builds upon the “There Is More than Critical Thinking! A Review of Higher Order Thinking” session. Did not attend? No worries, come join us anyway! Reflection is an essential part of learning! Taking a moment to think after a hard day, keeping a log, or debriefing after a scenario, we reflect all the time! Linked to reflection is understanding our motivations, be it intrinsic or extrinsic. As educators, we work hard to promote reflect and motivate! Join this session to reflect upon motivation and feel more motivated to reflect as sources of empowerment.

William Leggio, EdD, NRP

Paul Rosenberger, EdD, NRP

Trauma Interactive!

Monday, November 23; 2:30-3:30 pm

Test your knowledge of trauma emergencies as Bob covers relevant information on the latest in trauma care, injury recognition, assessment findings and current management techniques. It is a great comprehensive trauma review for any level provider. It is part game show, part case studies, 100% fun!

Bob Page, M.Ed., NRP, CCP, NCEE

You Call, We Don’t Haul: Documenting Refusals, Treatment in Place, and the Increasing Array of Non-Transport Situations

Monday, November 23; 2:30-3:30 pm

The landscape of EMS is evolving, and our documentation must change with it. Non-transport EMS is growing rapidly, and with it the payment possibilities for treatment with no transport, refusals of care and transport, transport to alternative destinations. Many of these situations have EMS practitioners scratching their heads just wondering who is considered a patient. And all these situations must be documented, and the documentation needs may be different the traditional standards may not apply. This session will help you set clear expectations for what needs to be documented in these increasingly frequent and diverse patient encounters.

Stephen Wirth, Attorney, Paramedic

When the Bite Is Worse than the Bark

Monday, November 23; 2:30-3:30 pm

Thousands of snakebite cases are reported every year in the United States. A bite from a venomous snake is rarely deadly but should always be treated as a medical emergency. Most of these types of bites produce an array of symptoms, including localized pain, swelling, convulsions, nausea and even paralysis. This presentation will describe the common types of snakes, the pathophysiology of their venom and what we as EMS providers need to do for these patients.

Chris Ebright, B.Ed., NRP

ECMO and EMS: What You Need to Know

Monday, November 23; 2:30-3:30 pm

Extra-corporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) is used to support critical ill patients when conventional therapies have failed. Over recent years, ECMO has emerged as an innovative therapy used for cases of severe hypoxic disorders and refractory cardiogenic shock.

Gary Schwartz, MD

Puff the Magic Dragon: What Will They Think of Next?

Monday, November 23; 2:30-3:30 pm

We have people eating Tide pods, we have people drinking bottles of cold syrup, we have people electrocuting themselves, now we have people vaping every kind of substance they can think of. How do we keep up? What are the outcomes of inhaling these noxious vapors? Let’s explore this new world of vaping and what is being vaped.

Rick Howard, RN, AEMT

Serious Illness Conversations

Monday, November 23; 3:40-4:40 pm

Are you identifying the patients who need this and connecting them to engage in shared decision making? State of the art, quality serious illness care means identifying patients who can benefit significantly from end-of-life conversations and working in our communities to link them up with resources for this. Conversations that advance goals of care provide the opportunity for care delivery to be concordant with known patient wishes. This lecture will help advance strategies for how to advocate for patients and their physicians to have these conversations. Also discussed will be the various documents that are used to have the results of these conversations be transportable from one care site to another for these patients.

Stuart Pickell, MD, Mdiv

Kim Callanan, MA

Because Your Lips are Moving

Monday, November 23; 3:40-4:40 pm

One of the challenges of a good patient assessment is the patient who is less than truthful. Maybe this is due to substance abuse, social or legal issues. As clinicians we need to identify and address any emergency medical problems. Let’s take a look at the role of the eyes, body language and speech patterns in identifying deceptive answers to your questions.

Larry Torrey, RN, EMT-P

“It’s Not Just the Calls” First Responder Stress from the Classroom to the Job

Monday, November 23; 3:40-4:40 pm

Public safety personnel, law enforcement, EMS, firefighters and dispatchers all face stress in their jobs and in their everyday lives. Unfortunately, this cumulative stress can lead to adverse health issue both physically and mentally, sometimes resulting in the final act of suicide. This presentation discusses the types of stress we encounter every day and how different situations can effect individuals in varying degrees of severity as well as how to know when our partners and ourselves are heading to the edge and what we can do about that.

Jules Scadden, Paramedic, EMS-Educator

Steel Cage Match with Kelly Grayson and Kenny Navarro: Have We Outgrown the American Heart Association?

Monday, November 23; 3:40-4:40 pm

In 2013, Kelly Grayson wrote an EMS1 column entitled, “Has ACLS Become a Merit Badge Without Merit?” Since then, he has become known as a vocal and passionate critic of the way the American Heart Association conducts its provider courses. With his “The Research Review” series on EMS1, Kenny Navarro has developed a nationwide reputation as an astute evaluator of resuscitation research, a respected EMS and ACLS educator, and a reasoned defender of the American Heart Association. Watch them both square off to debate whether EMS has outgrown the American Heart Association. It’s David vs Goliath, Apollo Creed vs Rocky Balboa, Freddy vs Jason, Sylvester vs Tweety, Bugs vs Daffy, it’s… well, it’s something we can’t quite describe, but it should be educational and entertaining! You can enjoy the show, decide where you stand, and maybe even break up a fight!

Steven “Kelly” Grayson, AGS, NRP, CCP

Kenny Navarro, LP

Oxygen: Why It May Not Be the Panacea You Think

Monday, November 23; 3:40-4:40 pm

For years, the theory on oxygen has been, “If a little is good, more is better.” New research is showing us that this may not be accurate. We will examine some of the latest science on oxygen administration and talk about the pathophysiology of oxygen toxicity and the ensuing effects on the body. We will discuss changes in the oxy-hemoglobin dissociation curve, how oxygen is utilized in the mitochondria and talk about the specifics that play into various types of hypoxia to better facilitate critical thinking in regard to treating patients with hypoxia. Hint: O2 admin is not always the answer.

Reuben Farnsworth, BS, CCP-C, CP-C, NRP

Gun Shot Wounds – “Seconds Count!”

Monday, November 23; 3:40-4:40 pm

This session is designed to help prehospital care practitioners and first responders better understand and manage gun shot wounds and realize that seconds count! Each year nearly 40,000 people are killed as a result of firearms. Medical reports indicate that nearly 600,000 people dial 9-1-1 and use the emergency medical services for extreme gun shot wounds each year. The high incidence of injury and death due to firearms is second only to motor vehicle accidents. This session will use gun violence data collected from U.S. cities, including New Orleans. During this session we will discuss types of weapons used and explain the following topics: types of injuries, mechanisms of injury, kinetic energy, shock from blood loss, Stop The Bleed! basic and advanced life support.

Ken Bouvier, NREMT-Paramedic

Be Diligent. Be Resourceful. Be Prepared for the Medicare Ground Ambulance Cost Data Collection

Monday, November 23; 3:40-4:40 pm

With the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is requiring that all providers of ground ambulance services collect and report expenditures, revenues, utilization and other departmental statistics. This data will be collected over a year period, with every provider being selected once. While some of the data points are like what is collected for the Texas Ambulance Supplemental Payment Program (ASPP) cost report, the Medicare cost survey requires significantly more detail. This collected data will be used to assess current payment rates and inform future reimbursement rates. In November 2019, CMS selected 2,600 ambulance providers to complete the Medicare Cost Survey this year, with 183 of these providers being in the state of Texas. Within the CMS cost survey collection notice they state the following: “Failure to sufficiently submit the required information will result in a 10 percent reduction to payments under the Ambulance Fee Schedule (AFS) for one year” (CMS, 2019). Precise and complete cost data collection is critical to the establishment of adequate future rates. In this presentation, Associate Manger James Dachos from Public Consulting Group will explore the process for completing the Medicare Cost Survey, the data needed for the survey, and the potential impact on future rates for ambulance providers. In addition, he will be answering any questions associated with the Medicare Cost Survey.

James Dachos

Matt Zavadsky, MS-HSA, EMT

The Right Stuff: Critical Thinking Application

Monday, November 23; 3:40-4:40 pm

Going through the courses and memorizing the parameters in labs and hemodynamics just aren’t enough. Being able to apply this knowledge to actual cases will help reinforce your knowledge and help “work out the kinks” of critical thinking and application. In this presentation, you will see actual case studies of patients, some with a lot of detail and some with very little detail for you to go on. From this, you must decide what is wrong with the patient, what the medical team did right or wrong and what YOU need to do to improve the patient’s outcome. Lab results, hemodynamics, misdiagnosis, shock states and ABGs’ with vent settings adjustments are reviewed.

Janet Taylor, CFRN, EMT-B, CEN, CCEMT-P

Is Your Classroom Ready for #FOAM?

Monday, November 23; 3:40-4:40 pm

Our students routinely use their phones, tablets and computers to find information online. We acknowledge that our textbooks provide a vital foundation but can become dated because of revision cycles. How do we make sure our students get the most relevant and reliable information to supplement the textbook and help their learning? FOAM! #FOAM and #FOAMed stand for Free Open Access Medical education. This presentation will discuss how and when to use this rich source in your classroom. Benefits and potential pitfalls are also included. Help integrate this valuable source into your classroom.

Daniel Limmer, AS, Paramedic, I/C

Caught in a Brainstorm, A Comprehensive Review of Seizures and Their Management

Monday, November 23; 3:40-4:40 pm

In this lecture, we will review seizures of all types, their pathophysiology, and various treatment modalities. Using video examples and case-based discussion, we will demonstrate the importance of differentiating seizure types, and develop effective treatment plans.

Veer Vithalani, MD, FACEP, FAEMS

Tuesday

Busting Boundaries: Six Leadership Strategies to Help Make Collaboration Work for You

Tuesday, November 24; 8:15-9:15 am

In today’s challenging health care environment, EMS leadership must stop building walls and protecting boundaries. Truly insightful leaders work to minimize the impact of the internal and external boundaries that hinder our ability to get things done. These leaders effectively break down the walls of obstruction by spanning across them–and transforming their organizations in the process. This session will help you reach beyond the boundaries that impede positive action. We’ll identify the boundaries that hinder leadership effectiveness. We will then outline six essential leadership strategies based on collaboration that will help bridge the divides that can stifle future success.

Stephen Wirth, Attorney, Paramedic

EMS Education Standards Revision Project

Tuesday, November 24; 8:15-9:15 am

The lesson will present the progress and an update regarding the revision of the National EMS Education Standards. The lesson will conclude by covering many common FAQs. Additionally, questions from the audience will answered.

Paul Rosenberger, BS, MPA, EdD

Bryan Ericson, MEd

Lead aVR: “The Forgotten Lead?”

Tuesday, November 24; 8:15-9:15 am

12-leads have been standard practice for years. Many books have been published over the years. Classes are taught in all forms of media. This class is different. In locating STEMI, 11 of the 12 leads are used. What about aVR? It has been called useless, the lone wolf, the forgotten lead. But recent studies have shed some new light on this lead that is worth a serious look. That is what we aim to do in this session, break down the criteria and try it out for ourselves and see what difference this can make in our interpretation of the ECG. Join Bob Page and in a groundbreaking session, that includes a generous amount of “eyes on” practice in various cases.

Bob Page, M.Ed., NRP, CCP, NCEE

“EMTs Save Paramedics!” BLS to ALS Care

Tuesday, November 24; 8:15-9:15 am

The foundation of good patient care begins with good BLS. Basic emergency care is practiced by all levels of EMS. Basic EMS provides immediate, often life-saving assessment and treatment sometimes before advanced EMS providers arrive. This lecture discusses basic emergency medical care and how it not only lays the foundation for life-saving emergency care but is necessary for enhancing the success of advanced medical treatments.

Jules Scadden, Paramedic, EMS-Educator

Sepsis Management Made Easy

Tuesday, November 24; 8:15-9:15 am

Sepsis is a potentially life-threatening condition that is not always easily managed. Early identification and the initiation of treatment in the field are often the key. Join Torrey as we discuss how to recognize important assessment findings and some of the early warning signs that your patient may be heading for septic shock.

Larry Torrey, RN, EMT-P

Don’t Let the Bathtub Overflow: Why Resiliency Is Important, and How To Develop It

Tuesday, November 24; 8:15-9:15 am

Every stressful event we experience fills up our “bathtub” a little bit more. Having resilience allows us to drain the bathtub before it overflows. This course provides an overview of what resilience is, why it is important, and what happens when we lack it. Attendees will also learn about different resilience factors and how they can be developed in order to improve resiliency.

Fiona Thomas, B.Sc., EMT-LP

Pediatric Video Case Reviews

Tuesday, November 24; 8:15-9:15 am

Using the pediatric systematic approach, we will view several pediatric case videos and work through an emergency assessment to discover what the underlying issue is.

Dusty Lynn-Page, RN, MSc., EMT-P

EMS Implications of Body Piercing

Tuesday, November 24; 8:15-9:15 am

With more and more of our patient population having more than a single body piercing, it can significantly impact our current medical treatment protocols. We will discuss the medical implications of the various forms of body piercing. The student should be able to compare and contrast various types of body piercing jewelry. By the end of the session, the student should be able to hypothesize potential difficulties with jewelry removal, justify the need for body piercing jewelry removal, and be able to write a protocol for appropriate instances for body piercing jewelry removal. We will demonstrate several removal techniques and suggestions for when a removal should take place. This presentation will be in graphic detail and should not be for the squeamish, overly sensitive, or the faint of heart.

David Sanko, BA, NRP

You Want an Ambulance Where?

Tuesday, November 24; 8:15-9:15 am

With ever increasing travel, and use of varied forms of communication, it is quite possible that your service may receive a call for a patient in any part of the world. Would you know what to do?

Using a mix of case studies this presentation looks at how this increasingly common challenge is met by the world’s busiest service.

Stephen Hines, Paramedic

Responding to Heroin, Fentanyl, and Opioid Overdoses

Tuesday, November 24; 9:25-10:25 am

This session is designed to help prehospital care practitioners, emergency nurses and physicians, respiratory, X-ray and lab technicians better understand and manage patients that have fell victim to heroin use. The impact of heroin use is felt across the United States with heroin being identified as one of the most important drug abuse issues effecting communities coast to coast. It is estimated that 50 million people worldwide are users of cocaine, heroin and synthetic drugs included in those numbers are 700,000 Americans who use heroin as a recreational drug to seek euphoria or a pleasurable rush.

 

Heroin under the chemical name (diamorphine, diacetylmorphine or morphine diacetate) is illegal to manufacture, possess or sell, which makes it also illegal to use. Heroin on the street is known to many as H, smack, boy, horse, brown, black and tar. Afghanistan’s multibillion dollar heroin business supplies 87 percent of the heroin in the world, while production in Mexico has risen six-fold since 2007 which makes it the second largest opium producer.

 

During this session we will discuss both Basic and Advanced treatment for managing heroin, fentanyl and opioid overdoses. We will discuss the dangers that emergency room nurses encounter when treating overdose patients. We will explain how heroin enters the brain and how it can affect other body functions including breathing and heartrate making it a life-threatening emergency.

Ken Bouvier, NREMT-Paramedic

Managing Burn and Blast Injuries Following an Industrial Mass Casualty Incident

Tuesday, November 24; 9:25-10:25 am

How would we manage patients suffering burn and blast injuries following an industrial mass casualty incident? We have learned much since the Texas City disaster of 1947, the deadliest industrial accident in US history. This lecture explores the latest protocols in managing large disasters, including the process of triaging and treating burn and blast injuries. Burn disasters can also exceed local and regional capability, but through effective communication, a knowledgeable team, and systematic management, these patients can survive even when faced with incredible odds.

Clayton Collins, BSN, RN, CPN

Gene McGowen, BS, RN

How to Conquer Your Next Presentation!

Tuesday, November 24; 9:25-10:25 am

How often have we sat through a boring death by power-point presentation? Yet at some point in our career we as EMS educators will be called upon to give a presentation. This lecture will teach the intricacies on how to deliver a great talk based on cognitive neuroscience. The attendee will learn brain-based learning methodologies and tips and tricks to delivering that perfect presentation.

Russ Brown, AAS NRP

How to Use the “Bag-of-Death” (BVM) Without Hurting the Patient: Lung Protective Ventilation Strategies

Tuesday, November 24; 9:25-10:25 am

Most everything in EMS has a risk benefit relationship: how much are you willing to risk to get the desired benefit? What if the risk has no benefit, would you still take it? Most likely not. This lecture will expose the unnecessary risk often taken when patients are manually ventilated. The one skill we have all mastered (at least we think so), learned early in EMT school and often turned over to the least trained person. Come learn what you may have been taught is now wrong, how proper manual ventilation can make a difference in outcomes and why some doctors have named the BVM the “Bag-of-Death.”

Steven LeCroy, MA, CRT, EMTP

Oooh, Ahhh, OH! How could THAT Have Happened?

Tuesday, November 24; 9:25-10:25 am

This session is not for the faint of heart. We will review scenarios as well as examine graphic trauma and medical pictures to determine possible causes and solutions. Let’s see how well you think outside the box!

Becky Valentine, BS, Paramedic, NCEE, MA I/C

What Dreams May Come: The Value of Sleep

Tuesday, November 24; 9:25-10:25 am

Fatigue is a consistent and constant issue in the EMS industry. In this discussion we will look at some of the current science regarding sleep and fatigue management. How much sleep do we need? What are the physiologic effects of sleep deprivation? What effects on performance develop secondary to sleep deprivation? Perhaps, most importantly, what can we do to improve sleep patterns, quality and quantity among EMS providers.

Reuben Farnsworth, BS, CCP-C, CP-C, NRP

Improving the Way We Take Care of Pediatric Patients

Tuesday, November 24; 9:25-10:25 am

Pediatric patients make up a small percentage of calls for most agencies. This lecture will cover tips to improve patient outcomes and patient care reports. Improving your documentation can assist agencies in treating the patient appropriately, prosecuting offenders, and could give the medical examiner the information needed to declare a cause of death. Changing the way we approach pediatric calls will help improve your outcomes and be the voice for your smallest patients.

Amy Corbett, BS, LP, CPSTI

History’s Mysteries: Interesting Ways Famous People Have Died

Tuesday, November 24; 9:25-10:25 am

Did you know that George Washington died of a sore throat? Or that John Ritter died of an aortic dissection? What about Christopher Reeve? Didn’t he die in a horseback related accident? No? In this presentation we will re-visit some famous and historical figures and evaluate their cause of death and some possible solutions that may (or may not) have helped save their lives. This is all about assessment and resources available and recognizing potential life threats.

Janet Taylor, CFRN, EMT-B, CEN, CCEMT-P

Extremes in Trauma: Geriatric and Pediatric Considerations

Tuesday, November 24; 10:55-11:55 am

We all know kids are not just small adults–or, are they? We are all taught that pediatric patients are not just small adults. For many reasons this is indeed true. However, let’s look at the general responses to trauma in both the geriatric and pediatric patient. Their similarities may just surprise you!

Dusty Lynn-Page, RN, MSc., EMT-P

Geriatric Trauma

Tuesday, November 24; 10:55-11:55 am

With the Baby-Boomers, the single largest population group of people, getting older and beginning to retire, this topic becomes more timely and applicable. Participants will be taken through the normal physiologic changes that occur with the aging process and then relate that to how it affects the traumatically injured victim. Participants will be given the information to help determine the underlying sequence of whether or not it was a medical patient first and then a trauma patient or vice versa.

David Sanko, BA, NRP

Love Shouldn’t Hurt: Recognizing and Treating Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault

Tuesday, November 24; 10:55-11:55 am

This lecture is about recognizing the physical and emotional signs/symptoms of domestic violence and sexual assault, and the prehospital treatment of these victims. It also provides information vital to the ongoing treatment of victims and resources available to them for mental health treatment, as well as financial and legal support options.

Kiersten Robinson, Paramedic

Brain Hacking: The Science of Learning and Why Teaching Matters

Tuesday, November 24; 10:55-11:55 am

It’s been drilled into our heads: We’re told that learning is all self-discipline, that we must confine ourselves to designated study areas, turn off the music, and maintain a strict ritual if we want to ace the test, memorize drug doses, or nail that IV skills station. But what if we’re wrong? Brain science is showing us how to help our students learn and retain information but teaching traditions are hard to break. This discussion talks about how brain science can give you practical strategies you can use in the classroom to help students learn.

Lance Villers, PhD, LP

Forensic Considerations for First Responders

Tuesday, November 24; 10:55-11:55 am

This lecture will provide information to first responders regarding special considerations at death scenes that involve forensic investigations, such as suicides, homicides and accidental deaths. Postmortem changes will also be reviewed to assist with documentation. Medical examiner law and specific scene details and pictures will be provided.

Julie Carriker, RN, CA-CP SANE, D-ABMDI

“Lit EMS” What the Literature Says about Airway Management in Cardiac Arrest

Tuesday, November 24; 10:55-11:55 am

Advanced Airway Management (AAM) is a critical skill and a core tool in the EMS toolbox. But, as “everyone knows”, paramedics should not be intubating. Or every piece of emergency apparatus should have an intubating paramedic on it. So… which is true, and which is “Fake News”? How are we to tell? Jarvis will provide a scientific basis by which medics can answer this question for themselves. He will provide a fast-paced review of the literature concerning EMS Advanced Airway Management and do so in a way that won’t put you to sleep.

Jeff Jarvis, MD, MS, EMT-P

EMS Employment Issues: Quirky Labor Laws Related to EMS

Tuesday, November 24; 10:55-11:55 am

EMS agencies are faced with a wide variety of federal, state and local laws and regulations which affect their operations. Employment laws are no different. Often, the unique characteristics of EMS operations make it challenging to apply those employment laws.

Mark Smith, JD, MBA, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

Lessons EMT Students Have Taught Their Educators

Tuesday, November 24; 1:00-2:00 pm

As EMS educators, we work hard to learn our craft, gather our experiences, read the most current literature to be sure we are giving our students the most current, best EMS medical practices. Have you ever stopped to think about all the things that you’ve been taught by your students? In this session, we will talk about all we’ve learned from them over the years.

Becky Valentine, BS, Paramedic, NCEE, MA I/C

Human Trafficking: What Is It and How Can EMS Help End It?

Tuesday, November 24; 1:00-2:00 pm

The lecture will provide information regarding human trafficking, including statistics, warning signs/red flags, language and jargon used, case presentation and ways to report as EMS providers.

John Gonzales, LP, BAAS

Dan Cohen, LP, BS

You’re Not a Student Sitter You Are an Educator

Tuesday, November 24; 1:00-2:00 pm

The lecture will discuss the role of the preceptor and skills trainers in regard to how they have an impact on student learning. This program will help program directors to develop an FTO, preceptor and skills trainer program.

Melissa Stuive, LP, M.Ed.

First Responder Suicide: What the Data Says

Tuesday, November 24; 1:00-2:00 pm

Many studies indicate that suicide rates among first responders are higher than the national average. However, the underlying cause is still a topic of debate. In this presentation, we will review previous and current research on first responder suicide. Additionally, we will discuss the current trends to resolve this crisis.

Dean Campa, MA, LP, FP-C, EMS-CC

Infectious Disease Response in Texas: CoVID-19

Tuesday, November 24; 1:00-2:00 pm

This lecture will include perspectives and experiences from the Coronavirus (CoVID-19) response in Texas after the initial cases of CoVID-19 from the Diamond Princess were flown in from California. Local hospital and EMS responses, as well as State Emergency Medical Task Force and Federal HHS Disaster Medical Assistance Team experiences will be reviewed.

Justin Fairless, DO, LP, NRP, FACEP

Sabotage!

Tuesday, November 24; 1:00-2:00 pm

This presentation is inspired by the Office of Strategic Services’ “Simple Sabotage Field Manual,” a declassified WWII document describing ways to sabotage the enemy. Ironically, many of those methods of sabotage are practiced today in EMS agencies all over! Attendees will discover some potential causes of sabotage within their organization and ways to resolve them to improve efficiency, productivity and morale.

Macara Trusty, MS, LP

Shane Beck

Using Social Media to Improve Community Safety

Tuesday, November 24; 1:00-2:00 pm

This presentation describes how an EMS agency can use social media to improve the safety of a community by sharing timely message campaigns through targeted social media venues. Attendees will see several examples of successful message campaigns along with explanations of how those campaigns aided in community safety. Attendees will also learn more about the different demographics of various social media avenues and how to use that information to customize community safety messages.

Ernesto Rodriguez, MA, LP

Michael Benavides, EMTP

Darren Noak, EMTP

Christa Stedman, EMTP

Baking Soda Basics: Recipe for Disaster?

Tuesday, November 24; 2:30-3:30 pm

Sodium bicarbonate (SB) has long been a mainstay of emergency treatment for a host of life-threatening conditions. Recent SB supply chain issues have necessitated rationing and/or guideline revisions for many EMS systems. Thankfully, however, evolving science suggests that SB may be more suitable for use in the kitchen, rather than in the back of an ambulance. This presentation will review evidence for and against the routine use of SB in several common prehospital scenarios.

Ronna Miller, MD

Substance Use Disorders and Treatment Options for EMS

Tuesday, November 24; 2:30-3:30 pm

The stressors placed on EMTs and paramedics during the course of responding to traumatic incidents over time could lead to undiagnosed issues of mental health and substance use within the workforce. In this session, we will discuss factors that contribute to these conditions, as well as potential strategies and treatment resources that are available within Texas.

James Langabeer, PhD, FAHA

Do We Have a JUST CULTURE?

Tuesday, November 24; 2:30-3:30 pm

With today’s increased focus on patient and provider safety, hospitals and accredited transport agencies are required to have a Culture of Safety–often referred to as a Just Culture. This system of accountability saves lives and money by focusing on adverse event prevention. Even though this is not a new topic, why don’t all EMS agencies embrace it? Does your agency have a Just Culture? This topic will explore what a Just Culture is and is not, examine the barriers to implementing it, and review the benefits to your patients and providers working in a Just Culture.

Thomas Liebman, FP-C, MBA, CMTE

Innocence for Sale

Tuesday, November 24; 2:30-3:30 pm

What do you think of when you hear the words “human trafficking”? Between cinema and news media, the words “human trafficking” are becoming more common. In fact, human trafficking is the fastest growing business in organized crime activity in the United States. Research has revealed that up to 88 percent of human trafficking victims accessed healthcare while being trafficked. As an emergency responder or healthcare provider, that means chances are high that you have treated a victim of human trafficking and may have not recognized the signs. This lecture will include takeaway points compiled from various resources, including the human trafficking victim-witness coordinator for Central Texas, The International Labor Organization, Allies Against Slavery, lessons learned from social services and emergency care providers, the Institute for Family Violence Studies and a victim of human trafficking.

Suh Hughart, EMT-P

Responding to the Sick and the Worried: A Perspective on the UK NHS Response to the Coronavirus

Tuesday, November 24; 2:30-3:30 pm

With call volumes rising rapidly, plans needed to be made, implemented and changed on a daily basis. With EMS calls in London passing 8,000 per day, there was no option to provide an ambulance for every caller. Yet “do nothing” is never an option. This presentation explores the challenges and lessons learned from the pandemic crisis.

Stephen Hines, Paramedic

Honoring the Past and Transforming the Future: 50 Years of the National Registry

Tuesday, November 24; 2:30-3:30 pm

Join the National Registry for a fascinating review of the organization’s first 50 years and learn where EMS certification is headed in the future. We will explore the development of the National EMS System and the important role certification continues to play in protecting the public. Following the presentation, National Registry leadership will invite lively discussion and dialog during a Q&A session.

NREMT Staff

Script It! Improve Individual EMT Skills Performance

Tuesday, November 24; 2:30-3:30 pm

This course provides an inventive way to get EMT students to learn/practice/perform skills without focusing so heavily on the skill sheet. The student’s role play and by doing so, they develop a rhythm to how the skill is performed. Then, when an individual skill is warranted in a patient assessment scenario, students actually go through the skill step-by-step instead of just verbalizing that they performed a skill.

Shannon Graham, LP, BS

Travis Hill LP, BS

The Top EMS Research Papers of 2020 and Why You Should Care

Tuesday, November 24; 2:30-3:30 pm

A practice-based discussion (NOT a journal club, don’t worry!) of 10 papers that changed my EMS practice in 2020. These are papers, for good or bad, that all paramedics, system directors and medical directors should know about.

Jeff Jarvis, MD, MS, EMT-P

Why Orange Isn’t Your Color: EMS Compliance

Tuesday, November 24; 2:30-3:30 pm

Fraud and enforcement actions are on the rise and ambulance providers are one of the primary targets of investigations. The federal government averages over $4 billion per year in recoveries related to health care fraud.

Mark Smith, JD, MBA, SPHR, SHRM-SCP

Improving STEMI Outcomes Through Collaboration

Tuesday, November 24; 3:40-4:40 pm

In this presentation the speakers will discuss best practices for EMS and hospitals to decrease first medical contact (EMS) to balloon times in patients suffering from an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). They will include discussion on public education on early activation of 9-1-1 services, EMS best practices will include rapid EKG performance, decreasing scene times, early activation of the Cardiac Cath Lab, and heparin administration. Hospital practice will include expedited activation procedures, straight to the Cath Lab by EMS, and an established feedback loop to EMS.

Karen Yates, MSN, RN, RN-BC, CEN, LP

Derek Bailey, FF, EMT-P

Tornado in the Trailerhood: A Rural Twist on MCI

Tuesday, November 24; 3:40-4:40 pm

This session will review MCI general concepts, START triage and challenges to rapid transport in a rural environment.

Sheila Sotherlund

Are You Prepared for the Next Disaster? Protect Your Team and Families from Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

Tuesday, November 24; 3:40-4:40 pm

As disasters or emergencies can occur at any time, it is important for first responders to be prepared without the worry of whether or not they are protected against the dangers of vaccine-preventable diseases that can be contracted on the job. It is also important to reduce the possibility of spreading the diseases to their families, who should also be fully vaccinated prior to an event. The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) Immunization Unit is committed to helping prepare for an emergency or disaster by improving vaccination coverage rates for first responders and their families. DSHS works to develop and strengthen partnerships with local health departments and first responder organizations. Through these partnerships, the DSHS Immunization Unit continues to expand first responders’ knowledge and use of both the Texas Immunization Registry, ImmTrac2, and adult immunizations, specifically, adult immunizations that come recommended by the Center for Disease Control (CDC). During this session, participants will be provided with information about the important role immunizations play in the daily activities of first responders. They will also be provided with information and strategies from the Texas First Responder Immunization Toolkit to help increase the immunization rates within the first responder organizations by recommending the ACIP adult immunizations to their staff, increasing the utilization of ImmTrac2 to record immunizations for consented adults, and raising awareness for the importance of adult immunizations among first responders.

Denise Starkey, MPH, MA

Kevin Allen

Damn! I’m Sicker than My Patient

Tuesday, November 24; 3:40-4:40 pm

This session looks at care providers and what goes on behind their doors. How do you cope with giving aid when you yourself are battling a lifelong condition? Are caregiver’s conditions a hinderance or a help to their career? How can managers assist and support their employees with their conditions?

Tamsin Fuller, BSc(hons) MInstP

Effective Simulation Techniques to Enhance EMS Scenarios: Beyond Mannequins and Moulage

Tuesday, November 24; 3:40-4:40 pm

Students love scenarios. Instructors love scenarios. Done correctly, with planning and purpose, scenarios can be an invaluable tool. Tossing a mannequin (or student) to the ground is ineffective, and spending hours applying moulage is typically not feasible. No-high fidelity mannequins here, just simple DIY techniques that will your students’ learning. This class will discuss how to keep scenarios relevant, realistic and revealing.

Teresa McLaughlin, Paramedic/Coordinator

Respecting Professional Boundaries: Student vs Instructor

Tuesday, November 24; 3:40-4:40 pm

Inappropriate relationships between teachers and students has been widely covered in the media over the last decade or two. How does that translate to EMS Professionals and EMS Education? EMS Professionals are taught to maintain professional boundaries between caregiver and patient, but when moving into an educational role, there is often minimal guidance in fulfilling that role. With the recent increase in high school EMT Programs, the boundaries should be even stronger. Join us as we discover what these boundaries look like as an EMS Educator, how to implement boundaries in your program/agency, and how to be accountable for them.

Macara Trusty, MS, LP

Jennifer Stout, AS, LP

Firelines: Radical Discussion on the Wildfire that Is Burnout

Tuesday, November 24; 3:40-4:40 pm

At a point when we face provider shortages we must ask why? Does burnout effect clinical decisions and customer satisfaction? Burnout has many faces and recovery from this mental status can mean longevity in a career or change in the culture of the department. But how? We must address, understand and face this situation to succeed. The wildfire that is burnout can and will consume providers–radical problems need radical dynamic solutions. Let’s build a resilient front to combat this fire.

Justin Reed, LP, BS, FACPE

Juan Mejias, NRP, FPC

Wednesday

A Primer on Transgender and Nonbinary Identities for First Responders

Wednesday, November 25; 8:30-9:30 am

First responders are likely to encounter transgender and nonbinary individuals both as their patients and their coworkers. Understanding these populations is critical for first responders in order to provide compassionate and competent care. Education can improve patient interactions, quality of patient care, and also decrease bullying and harassment in the workplace.

Fiona Thomas, B.Sc., EMT-LP

Patient, Family, Provider: The Triad of a Call

Wednesday, November 25; 8:30-9:30 am

Every day we respond to calls not knowing who we are picking up, who we are treating or the family’s level of education. This presentation will cover the aspects of being in each of these rolls and the stress behind them, including not being the provider role in a call, dealing with family that could be out of control and not becoming that person, being aware of the fact your patient or family is medically trained, and the PTSD of dealing with being each of positions. Lastly with how we are providers need to take better care of ourselves before we become the patient.

Tina Amlin, LP

This Might Be Your Grandma’s Brain: Emerging Science of TBI for EMS

Wednesday, November 25; 9:40-10:40 am

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) exacts huge costs on individuals, families and society due to death and disability. The dictum to “avoid hypotension & hypoxia” during BLS/ALS EMS care needs refinement, based on new physiologic endpoints different from those used in general trauma treatment. This presentation reviews major findings of the EPIC TBI Trial and other evidence-based recommendations for conventional BLS and ALS TBI assessment and care, as well as new and emerging technologies that may lead to better outcomes.

Ronna Miller, MD